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Late 19th Century French Napoleon III Marquetry Decanters

$2,350.00

French Napoleon III marquetry inlaid rosewood tantalus, the inlaid lid decorated with a marquetry medallion, opening to a fitted interior with a removable stemware holder, consisting of (4) decanters each with a cut glass rectangular stopper and (9) cordial stems,...


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French Napoleon III marquetry inlaid rosewood tantalus, the inlaid lid decorated with a marquetry medallion, opening to a fitted interior with a removable stemware holder, consisting of (4) decanters each with a cut glass rectangular stopper and (9) cordial stems, the case rising on bun feet.

Year: Late 19th Century

Dimensions: 10.5 in. H x 12.5 in. W x 9 in. D (with key)

A decanter is a vessel that is used to hold the decantation of a liquid (such as wine) which may contain sediment. Decanters are normally used as serving vessels for wine. Decanters vary in shape and design. They are made using a variety of materials like glass and crystal. They typically hold at least one standard bottle of wine (0.75 litre). A similar kind of vessel, the carafe /kəˈræf/, is used for serving wine as well as other drinks, but is not supplied with a stopper.

Throughout the history of wine, decanters have played a significant role in the serving of wine. The vessels would be filled with wine from amphoras and brought to the table where they could be more easily handled by a single servant. The Ancient Romans pioneered the use of glass as a material. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, glass production became scarce causing the majority of decanters to be made of bronze, silver, gold, or earthenware. The Venetians reintroduced glass decanters during the Renaissance period and pioneered the style of a long slender neck that opens to a wide body, increasing the exposed surface area of the wine, allowing it to react with air. In the 1730s, British glass makers introduced the stopper to limit exposure to air. Since then, there has been little change to the basic aspects of the decanter.


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